Posts tagged New York City

Argentine chef and grillmaster Francis Mallmann heats up il Buco Alimentari with a juicy feast and 4-course menu to celebrate today’s launch of his new cookbook Mallmann on Fire.

Today we’re commemorating the 13th anniversary of 9/11 and honoring the nearly 3,000 men, women and children who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. May peace find their loved ones. 

Today we’re commemorating the 13th anniversary of 9/11 and honoring the nearly 3,000 men, women and children who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. May peace find their loved ones. 

Where to Watch the World Cup in NYC

When it comes to nationalities, New York City is the proverbial melting pot – a fact that is unmistakably clear during the World Cup.

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The United States scooped up the largest number of World Cup tickets second to only Brazil, but if you can’t make it south for the festivities, you can still get in on the action.

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Just pick from this list of Manhattan bars and restaurants whose homelands hold the most World Cup titles in history. From June 12 to July 13, they’ll be showing the games, so go grab a drink and rendezvous with these world champs. They’re sure to make good company.  

Brazil – Many argue that Brazil has the best of everything, including the most beautiful supermodels and the largest collection of World Cup trophies (five) in the history of the game. With home-field advantage, the Seleção might make it six.  

  • Felix – Squeeze into this SoHo resto, where you may or may not end up standing on the bar, caipirinha in hand, rooting for the World Cup favorite. Get there early because it fills up fast. 340 W. Broadway, at Grand St.; 212-431-0021; felixnyc.com
  • S.O.B.’s  - If you want to get wild, carnival-style, head downtown to the famous Brazilian music club, where you can get your samba on to live percussionists while watching the games. 200 Varick St., at W. Houston St.; 212-243-4940; sobs.com

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Italy – If the Azzurri win, they’ll be tied with Brazil for World Cup titles.  

  • Grotta Azzurra - There’s only one place to watch Italy shoot their way to the top (pardon the Godfather pun) and that’s Little Italy. Head to the historic trattoria Grotta Azzurra; it’s been around for every World Cup since 1930. 177 Mulberry St., at Broome St.; 212-925-8775; bluegrotta.com

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Germany — Germany only has three wins, but they’ve made it to the finals more times than any other team.

  • Zum Schneider – This Bavarian bar is not for the faint of heart. It’s like Oktoberfest with cleats, and a rowdy good time if you’re happy to catch World Cup fever. 109 Avenue C at 7th St.; 212-598-1098; zumschneider.com

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Argentina & Uruguay – Argentina and Uruguay are tied with two titles each, which is befitting since they were the same country until the early 19th century.

  • Novecento – Since Argentina has arguably the best player in the world, and maybe of all time – Lionel Messi – this Argentine SoHo hotspot will be packed with patriotic porteños. 343 W. Broadway, at Grand St.; 212-925-4706; novecento.com

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Spain, France & England – These three European nations are all fighting to bring home their second golden statue.

  • La Nacional – This down-home tapas restaurant will be rooting for a repeat of World Cup 2010 when Spain went home as victors. 239 W. 14th St., between Seventh and Eighth Aves.; 212-243-9308; lanacionaltapas.com
  • La Opia – For an appropriately sophisticated French scene, sip Lillet at this Midtownhaunt. They’ll be showing every game.Renaissance Hotel, 130 E. 57th St., at Lexington Ave.; 212-688-3939; opiarestaurant.com
  • Nevada Smiths – It’s a little unclear whether this hardcore soccer joint is British or Irish, but fans from all backgrounds unite at this house of worship where football is the reigning religion. 100 Third Ave., between 12th and 13th Sts.; 212-982-2591; nevadasmiths.net

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Images courtesy of FIFA, Felix, Zum Schneider & Nevada Smiths

Written by Nora Walsh for Galavante.com

Adjusting to Mendoza

People keep asking me how I am adjusting to Mendoza. I have been living here for six months now and I can undoubtedly say the most difficult adjustment has been adapting to the food.

In New York City I was so accustomed to variety, delivery and dining out. I used to pick up fresh salads for lunch on a daily basis. In the evening, my husband and I would order from one our favorite restaurants for seafood, burgers, sushi, Pad Thai, ramen, thin crust pizza, burritos…you get the point.

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Or we would choose a restaurant from my laundry list of notable eateries for a date night of delicious dining. Cooking a wholesome dinner was somewhat of a rarity in our home.

The truth is, I’m the type of girl who bypasses Barneys to shop at H&M, but will regularly shell out hard-earned cash for chef’s cuisine, mostly because I like to eat well without sweating over an oven to do so.

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Also, for many years I’ve loosely followed the Specific Carbohydrate Diet due to an inflammatory digestive tract, which basically eliminates all the foods I crave—starches, grains, sugar, and dairy. With so many dining options in NYC, these restrictions were relatively easy to follow when necessary.

Not so much in Mendoza. If you’re not interested in eating meat, pizza, pasta, empanadas or milanesas, generally you’re out of luck. This drastic change in diet has taken a serious toll on my overall health. I have been catching colds or the flu almost every month and my digestion has been subpar.

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So I decided to take the bull by the horns and tackle my nutrition (and the kitchen) head on. Ironically, all that I am learning about nutritional health is pushing me towards a vegetarian diet in the beef capital of the world. I’m avoiding processed foods and dairy whenever possible. I am also making a concerted effort to balance out my pH with as many alkaline rich foods as I can, which means lots more veggies.

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Thus, I’m cooking everyday (much to my husband’s delight). I buy colorful fruits and vegetables at a local produce shop to make fresh salads, soups, stews, stir-fry, and my favorite Argentine dish—the tarta, which is similar to a quiche minus the butter and cream.

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I’ve even been flavoring meals with herbs and chilies from my little home garden. (It’s the first time I have grown anything in my entire life!)

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My favorite natural market, Indigo, also has a variety of hard to find organic nuts, seeds, dried fruit, beans and mineral salts. I even learned how to make my own nut milk there. (More on that in another post.)

As a newbie cook, it takes me hours to prepare meals, but this is the novelty of my life in Mendoza—I actually have time.

Life on Low Heat

Cooking was a novelty for me in New York City. By the time I got home from work after a long racing day, all I wanted was to satisfy my hunger. I rarely mustered the wherewithal to prepare a meal and wait for it to cook while I was starving. I typically sought 20-minute delivery dinners to satiate my appetite, so I could move on to something I truly enjoyed doing with my precious free time.

Mendoza is not the ethnic melting pot of New York City. There’s very little variety when it comes to cuisine, much less delicious take-out. (Oh, how I miss fresh salad bars, seafood and ramen.) Which, in a way, is a good thing because it is forcing me to cook things I crave, like vegetables.

When I used to cook in New York, it was always on high heat. I wanted it to be done the quickest way possible. Since I have been in Mendoza, I’ve begun to let my food cook more slowly on lower temperatures, resulting in much more flavorful dishes. I’m certain the same richness will reveal itself with a slower pace of life.

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PINTA NY Latin American Art Fair

For all you Latin American art lovers, the PINTA NY art fair is taking place at a new location this year: 82MERCER. (Where I stuff my face every year at NYC Wine & Food Festival’s Meatball Madness event.)

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This Friday through Sunday, modern and contemporary art from Central and South America, Spain, Portugal, and The Caribbean will be showcased and auctioned. Fifty prominent galleries are partnering with PINTA NY to exhibit museum-quality works of abstract, concrete, neo-concrete, kinetic, and conceptual art.

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If you can’t make it to the fair, you can check out Artsy.net, which features artworks, exhibitors, editorial coverage and fair highlights selected by art world insiders.

Many of the sponsors hail from Argentina, including the Malbec wine label Terrazas de los Andes, Marca Pais Argentina, Ciudad de Buenos Aires Turismo Cultural Curator and Soho’s Argentine restaurant—Novecento (where I go to watch important soccer matches).

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Soho Grand Hotel is the official hotel of PINTA NY and is offering discounted rates for PINTA NY guests. LATAM is also offering a generous 20% discount on flights to and from New York during PINTA NY, for any last minute weekend travelers.

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PINTA NY Details: 

~Tickets:

  • General Admission $25.00 and $10.00 for students.
  • Tix can be purchased on-site during exhibition hours. 

~Exhibition Dates and Times:

  • Friday, November 15 - 12pm – 8pm
  • Saturday, November 16 - 12pm – 8pm
  • Sunday, November 17 - 12pm – 7pm

~Location: 82MERCER

  • 82 Mercer Street
  • New York, NY 10012

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Images courtesy of PINTA NY. 

I think I just might.

I think I just might.

Becoming an Expat in Argentina

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After I graduated college, I traversed much of South America with only a backpack and a sense of adventure.  For almost a year, I ping-ponged north and south, east and west, and back again. I spent countless hours, half reclined on a bus, alternating a handful of CDs on my Discman until I arrived at the next destination. It was thrilling and tiresome. I felt completely free, and many times, overwhelmed by choice. I drifted where the wind blew me. I expanded. I connected. I made lifelong friends with memories to match. I returned home replete, full of hope, and pregnant with fear that I might never find a place in the world where I felt so alive.

I planted myself in New York City. It took time to grow roots and find the sunshine. I fought hard for a space to flourish. Over seven years, I found a neighborhood that suited me, an apartment I called home, a livelihood that nourished my passions, a family of friends, and a husband that I loved. I was comfortable and happy.

My husband, who is from Argentina, has always expressed the desire to live in his home country at some point in our lives. For many years, I have also nurtured the fantasy of returning to South America and living abroad as an adult. As we creep further into our thirties, and are still without children, we decided this was an opportune time to uproot ourselves and enjoy a slower pace of life in his hometown, the Napa Valley of the south—Mendoza, Argentina.  

Thus, we’ve traded comfort for adventure, apples for grapes, and coffee for mate.

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While he greets all that is familiar, I straddle the unknown at a daunting, yet liberating crossroads.  We shall see where the wind takes me this time. Feel free to come along for the ride.  

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There’s no better place to rest your head.

There’s no better place to rest your head.

Dreaming big…

Dreaming big…

Spring flourishes in Grand Army Plaza in New York City. 

Spring flourishes in Grand Army Plaza in New York City. 

Subway Art

Subway Art

Doyers Street, Chinatown, NYC

Doyers Street, Chinatown, NYC

Big trouble in little China.

Big trouble in little China.

Residential Upper East Side. 

Residential Upper East Side.